Sweetness is one of the main drivers of consumer preference, and thus is given high priority in apple breeding programmes. Due to the complexity of sweetness evaluation, soluble solid content (SSC) is commonly used as an estimation of this trait. Nevertheless, it has been demonstrated that SSC and sweet taste are poorly correlated. Though individual sugar content may vary greatly between and within apple cultivars, no previous study has tried to investigate the relationship between the amount of individual sugars, or ratios of these, and apple sweetness. In this work, we quantified the major sugars (sucrose, glucose, fructose, xylose) and sorbitol and explored their influence on perceived sweetness in apple; we also related this to malic acid content, SSC and volatile compounds. Our data confirmed that the correlation between sweetness and SSC is weak. We found that sorbitol content correlates (similarly to SSC) with perceived sweetness better than any other single sugar or total sugar content. The single sugars show no differentiable importance in determining apple sweetness. Our predictive model based on partial least squares regression shows that after sorbitol and SSC, the most important contribution to apple sweetness is provided by several volatile compounds, mainly esters and farnesene

Aprea, E.; Charles, M.C.; Endrizzi, I.; Corollaro, M.L.; Betta, E.; Biasioli, F.; Gasperi, F. (2017). Sweet taste in apple: the role of sorbitol, individual sugars, organic acids and volatile compounds. SCIENTIFIC REPORTS, 7 (44950): 1-10. doi: 10.1038/srep44950 handle: http://hdl.handle.net/10449/37241

Sweet taste in apple: the role of sorbitol, individual sugars, organic acids and volatile compounds

Aprea, Eugenio
Primo
;
Charles, Mathilde Clemence;Endrizzi, Isabella;Corollaro, Maria Laura;Betta, Emanuela;Biasioli, Franco;Gasperi, Flavia
Ultimo
2017-01-01

Abstract

Sweetness is one of the main drivers of consumer preference, and thus is given high priority in apple breeding programmes. Due to the complexity of sweetness evaluation, soluble solid content (SSC) is commonly used as an estimation of this trait. Nevertheless, it has been demonstrated that SSC and sweet taste are poorly correlated. Though individual sugar content may vary greatly between and within apple cultivars, no previous study has tried to investigate the relationship between the amount of individual sugars, or ratios of these, and apple sweetness. In this work, we quantified the major sugars (sucrose, glucose, fructose, xylose) and sorbitol and explored their influence on perceived sweetness in apple; we also related this to malic acid content, SSC and volatile compounds. Our data confirmed that the correlation between sweetness and SSC is weak. We found that sorbitol content correlates (similarly to SSC) with perceived sweetness better than any other single sugar or total sugar content. The single sugars show no differentiable importance in determining apple sweetness. Our predictive model based on partial least squares regression shows that after sorbitol and SSC, the most important contribution to apple sweetness is provided by several volatile compounds, mainly esters and farnesene
Sweetness
Sensory perception
Regression models
Volatile Organic Compounds
Sugars
Settore AGR/15 - SCIENZE E TECNOLOGIE ALIMENTARI
2017
Aprea, E.; Charles, M.C.; Endrizzi, I.; Corollaro, M.L.; Betta, E.; Biasioli, F.; Gasperi, F. (2017). Sweet taste in apple: the role of sorbitol, individual sugars, organic acids and volatile compounds. SCIENTIFIC REPORTS, 7 (44950): 1-10. doi: 10.1038/srep44950 handle: http://hdl.handle.net/10449/37241
File in questo prodotto:
File Dimensione Formato  
2017 Aprea.pdf

accesso aperto

Licenza: Creative commons
Dimensione 583.32 kB
Formato Adobe PDF
583.32 kB Adobe PDF Visualizza/Apri

I documenti in IRIS sono protetti da copyright e tutti i diritti sono riservati, salvo diversa indicazione.

Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10449/37241
Citazioni
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.pmc??? ND
  • Scopus 112
  • ???jsp.display-item.citation.isi??? 99
social impact