This study aimed to establish relationships between wine composition and in-mouth sensory properties using a sensometabolomic approach. Forty-two red wines were sensorially assessed and chemically characterised using UPLC‐QTOF-MS for targeted and untargeted analyses. Suitable partial least squares regression models were obtained for “dry”, “sour”, “oily”, “prickly”, and “unctuous”. “Dry” was positively contributed by flavan-3-ols, anthocyanin derivatives (AntD), valine, gallic acid and its ethyl ester, and peptides, and negatively by sulfonated flavan-3-ols, anthocyanin-ethyl-flavan-3-ols, tartaric acid, flavonols (FOL), hydroxycinnamic acids (HA), protocatechuic ethyl ester, and proline. The “sour” model included molecules involved in “dry” and “bitter”, ostensibly as a result of cognitive interactions. Derivatives of FOLs, epicatechin gallate, and N-acetyl-glucosamine phosphate contributed positively to “oily”, as did vanillic acid, HAs, pyranoanthocyanins, and malvidin-flavan-3-ol derivatives for “prickly”, and sugars, glutathione disulfide, AntD, FOL, and one HA for “unctuous”. The presented approach offers an interesting tool for deciphering the sensory-active compounds involved in mouthfeel perception

Ferrero-del-Teso, S.; Arapitsas, P.; Jeffery, D.W.; Ferreira, C.; Mattivi, F.; Fernández-Zurbano, P.; Sáenz-Navajas, M. (2024). Exploring UPLC‐QTOF-MS‐based targeted and untargeted approaches for understanding wine mouthfeel: a sensometabolomic approach. FOOD CHEMISTRY, 437 (1): 137726. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2023.137726 handle: https://hdl.handle.net/10449/82756

Exploring UPLC‐QTOF-MS‐based targeted and untargeted approaches for understanding wine mouthfeel: a sensometabolomic approach

Arapitsas, Panagiotis;Mattivi, Fulvio;
2024-01-01

Abstract

This study aimed to establish relationships between wine composition and in-mouth sensory properties using a sensometabolomic approach. Forty-two red wines were sensorially assessed and chemically characterised using UPLC‐QTOF-MS for targeted and untargeted analyses. Suitable partial least squares regression models were obtained for “dry”, “sour”, “oily”, “prickly”, and “unctuous”. “Dry” was positively contributed by flavan-3-ols, anthocyanin derivatives (AntD), valine, gallic acid and its ethyl ester, and peptides, and negatively by sulfonated flavan-3-ols, anthocyanin-ethyl-flavan-3-ols, tartaric acid, flavonols (FOL), hydroxycinnamic acids (HA), protocatechuic ethyl ester, and proline. The “sour” model included molecules involved in “dry” and “bitter”, ostensibly as a result of cognitive interactions. Derivatives of FOLs, epicatechin gallate, and N-acetyl-glucosamine phosphate contributed positively to “oily”, as did vanillic acid, HAs, pyranoanthocyanins, and malvidin-flavan-3-ol derivatives for “prickly”, and sugars, glutathione disulfide, AntD, FOL, and one HA for “unctuous”. The presented approach offers an interesting tool for deciphering the sensory-active compounds involved in mouthfeel perception
Sensory analysis
High-resolution MSPLS regression
Drying
Astringency
Anthocyanins
Amino acids
Peptides
Settore CHIM/10 - CHIMICA DEGLI ALIMENTI
2024
Ferrero-del-Teso, S.; Arapitsas, P.; Jeffery, D.W.; Ferreira, C.; Mattivi, F.; Fernández-Zurbano, P.; Sáenz-Navajas, M. (2024). Exploring UPLC‐QTOF-MS‐based targeted and untargeted approaches for understanding wine mouthfeel: a sensometabolomic approach. FOOD CHEMISTRY, 437 (1): 137726. doi: 10.1016/j.foodchem.2023.137726 handle: https://hdl.handle.net/10449/82756
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