Aim: Fungi are major drivers of ecosystem functioning. Increases in aridity are known to negatively impact fungal community composition in dryland ecosystems globally; yet, much less is known on the potential influence of other environmental drivers, and whether these relationships are linear or nonlinear. Time period: 2017–2021. Location: Global. Major taxa studied: Fungi. Methods: We re-analysed multiple datasets from different dryland biogeographical regions, for a total of 912 samples and 1,483 taxa. We examined geographical patterns in community diversity and composition, and spatial, edaphic and climatic factors driving them. Results: UV index, climate seasonality, and sand content were the most important environmental predictors of community shifts, showing the strongest association with the richness of putative plant pathogens and saprobes. Important nonlinear relationships existed with each of these fungal guilds, with increases in UV and temperature seasonality above 7.5 and 900 SD (standard deviation x 100 of the mean monthly temperature), respectively, being associated with an increased probability of plant pathogen and unspecified saprotroph occurrence. Conversely, these environmental parameters had a negative relationship with litter and soil saprotroph richness. Consequently, these ecological groups might be particularly sensitive to shifts in UV radiation and climate seasonality, which is likely to disturb current plant–soil dynamics in drylands. Main conclusions: Our synthesis integrates fungal community data from drylands across the globe, allowing the investigation of fungal distribution and providing the first evidence of shifts in fungal diversity and composition of key fungal ecological groups along diverse spatial, climatic and edaphic gradients in these widely distributed ecosystems. Our findings imply that shifts in soil structure and seasonal climatic patterns induced by global change will have disproportionate consequences for the distribution of fungal groups linked to vegetation and biogeochemical cycling in drylands, with implications for plant–soil interactions in drylands

Egidi, E.; Delgado‐baquerizo, M.; Berdugo, M.; Guirado, E.; Albanese, D.; Singh, B.K.; Coleine, C. (2023). UV index and climate seasonality explain fungal community turnover in global drylands. GLOBAL ECOLOGY AND BIOGEOGRAPHY, 32 (1): 132-144. doi: 10.1111/geb.13607 handle: https://hdl.handle.net/10449/78989

UV index and climate seasonality explain fungal community turnover in global drylands

Albanese, Davide;
2023-01-01

Abstract

Aim: Fungi are major drivers of ecosystem functioning. Increases in aridity are known to negatively impact fungal community composition in dryland ecosystems globally; yet, much less is known on the potential influence of other environmental drivers, and whether these relationships are linear or nonlinear. Time period: 2017–2021. Location: Global. Major taxa studied: Fungi. Methods: We re-analysed multiple datasets from different dryland biogeographical regions, for a total of 912 samples and 1,483 taxa. We examined geographical patterns in community diversity and composition, and spatial, edaphic and climatic factors driving them. Results: UV index, climate seasonality, and sand content were the most important environmental predictors of community shifts, showing the strongest association with the richness of putative plant pathogens and saprobes. Important nonlinear relationships existed with each of these fungal guilds, with increases in UV and temperature seasonality above 7.5 and 900 SD (standard deviation x 100 of the mean monthly temperature), respectively, being associated with an increased probability of plant pathogen and unspecified saprotroph occurrence. Conversely, these environmental parameters had a negative relationship with litter and soil saprotroph richness. Consequently, these ecological groups might be particularly sensitive to shifts in UV radiation and climate seasonality, which is likely to disturb current plant–soil dynamics in drylands. Main conclusions: Our synthesis integrates fungal community data from drylands across the globe, allowing the investigation of fungal distribution and providing the first evidence of shifts in fungal diversity and composition of key fungal ecological groups along diverse spatial, climatic and edaphic gradients in these widely distributed ecosystems. Our findings imply that shifts in soil structure and seasonal climatic patterns induced by global change will have disproportionate consequences for the distribution of fungal groups linked to vegetation and biogeochemical cycling in drylands, with implications for plant–soil interactions in drylands
Climate change
Drylands
Environmental predictors
Fungal traits
Fungi
Settore BIO/07 - ECOLOGIA
2023
Egidi, E.; Delgado‐baquerizo, M.; Berdugo, M.; Guirado, E.; Albanese, D.; Singh, B.K.; Coleine, C. (2023). UV index and climate seasonality explain fungal community turnover in global drylands. GLOBAL ECOLOGY AND BIOGEOGRAPHY, 32 (1): 132-144. doi: 10.1111/geb.13607 handle: https://hdl.handle.net/10449/78989
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