Regulated erroneous protein translation (adaptive mistranslation) increases proteome diversity and produces advantageous phenotypic variability in the human pathogen Candida albicans. It also increases fitness in the presence of fluconazole, but the underlying molecular mechanism is not understood. To address this question, we evolved hypermistranslating and wild-type strains in the absence and presence of fluconazole and compared their fluconazole tolerance and resistance trajectories during evolution. The data show that mistranslation increases tolerance and accelerates the acquisition of resistance to fluconazole. Genome sequencing, array-based comparative genome analysis, and gene expression profiling revealed that during the course of evolution in fluconazole, the range of mutational and gene deregulation differences was distinctively different and broader in the hypermistranslating strain, including multiple chromosome duplications, partial chromosome deletions, and polyploidy. Especially, the increased accumulation of loss-of-heterozygosity events, aneuploidy, translational and cell surface modifications, and differences in drug efflux seem to mediate more rapid drug resistance acquisition under mistranslation. Our observations support a pivotal role for adaptive mistranslation in the evolution of drug resistance in C. albicans

Weil, T.F.A.L.; Santamaría, R.; Lee, W.; Rung, J.; Tocci, N.; Abbey, D.; Bezerra, A.R.; Carreto, L.; Moura, G.R.; Bayés, M.; Gut, I.G.; Csikasz Nagy, A.; Cavalieri, D.; Berman, J.; Santos, M.A.S. (2017). Adaptive mistranslation accelerates the evolution of fluconazole resistance and induces major genomic and gene expression alterations in Candida albicans. MSPHERE, 2 (4): e00167-17. doi: 10.1128/mSphere.00167-17 handle: http://hdl.handle.net/10449/43126

Adaptive mistranslation accelerates the evolution of fluconazole resistance and induces major genomic and gene expression alterations in Candida albicans

Weil, Tobias Franz Anton Ludwig;Tocci, Noemi;Csikasz Nagy, Attila;Cavalieri, Duccio;
2017-01-01

Abstract

Regulated erroneous protein translation (adaptive mistranslation) increases proteome diversity and produces advantageous phenotypic variability in the human pathogen Candida albicans. It also increases fitness in the presence of fluconazole, but the underlying molecular mechanism is not understood. To address this question, we evolved hypermistranslating and wild-type strains in the absence and presence of fluconazole and compared their fluconazole tolerance and resistance trajectories during evolution. The data show that mistranslation increases tolerance and accelerates the acquisition of resistance to fluconazole. Genome sequencing, array-based comparative genome analysis, and gene expression profiling revealed that during the course of evolution in fluconazole, the range of mutational and gene deregulation differences was distinctively different and broader in the hypermistranslating strain, including multiple chromosome duplications, partial chromosome deletions, and polyploidy. Especially, the increased accumulation of loss-of-heterozygosity events, aneuploidy, translational and cell surface modifications, and differences in drug efflux seem to mediate more rapid drug resistance acquisition under mistranslation. Our observations support a pivotal role for adaptive mistranslation in the evolution of drug resistance in C. albicans
Candida albicans
Fluconazole
LOH
Aneuploidy
Codon ambiguity
Drug resistance evolution
Phenotypic variability
Protein mistranslation
Settore BIO/19 - MICROBIOLOGIA GENERALE
Weil, T.F.A.L.; Santamaría, R.; Lee, W.; Rung, J.; Tocci, N.; Abbey, D.; Bezerra, A.R.; Carreto, L.; Moura, G.R.; Bayés, M.; Gut, I.G.; Csikasz Nagy, A.; Cavalieri, D.; Berman, J.; Santos, M.A.S. (2017). Adaptive mistranslation accelerates the evolution of fluconazole resistance and induces major genomic and gene expression alterations in Candida albicans. MSPHERE, 2 (4): e00167-17. doi: 10.1128/mSphere.00167-17 handle: http://hdl.handle.net/10449/43126
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