The moth Lobesia botrana (Denis & Schiffermüller) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) feeds on grapes (Vitis vinifera L.), reducing yield and increasing susceptibility to fungal infections. L. botrana is among the most economically important insects in Europe and has recently been found in vineyards in Chile, Argentina, and California. Here, we review L. botrana biology and behavior in relation to its larval host (the grapevine) and its natural enemies. We also discuss current and future control strategies in light of our knowledge of chemical ecology, with an emphasis on the use of the sex pheromone-based strategies as an environmentally safe management approach. Pheromone-mediated mating disruption is the most promising technique available on grapes and is currently implemented on ≍140,000 ha in Europe. Experience from several growing areas confirms the importance of collaboration between research, extension, growers, and pheromone-supply companies for the successful implementation of the mating disruption technique. In the vineyards where mating disruption has been successfully applied as an areawide strategy, the reduction in insecticide use has improved the quality of life for growers, consumers, as well as the public living near wine-growing areas and has thereby reduced the conflict between agricultural and urban communities.

Ioriatti, C.; Anfora, G.; Tasin, M.; De Cristofaro, A.; Witzgall, P.; Lucchi, A. (2011). Chemical ecology and management of Lobesia botrana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC ENTOMOLOGY, 104 (4): 1125-1137. doi: 10.1603/EC10443 handle: http://hdl.handle.net/10449/20282

Chemical ecology and management of Lobesia botrana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae)

Ioriatti, Claudio;Anfora, Gianfranco;Tasin, Marco;
2011-01-01

Abstract

The moth Lobesia botrana (Denis & Schiffermüller) (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae) feeds on grapes (Vitis vinifera L.), reducing yield and increasing susceptibility to fungal infections. L. botrana is among the most economically important insects in Europe and has recently been found in vineyards in Chile, Argentina, and California. Here, we review L. botrana biology and behavior in relation to its larval host (the grapevine) and its natural enemies. We also discuss current and future control strategies in light of our knowledge of chemical ecology, with an emphasis on the use of the sex pheromone-based strategies as an environmentally safe management approach. Pheromone-mediated mating disruption is the most promising technique available on grapes and is currently implemented on ≍140,000 ha in Europe. Experience from several growing areas confirms the importance of collaboration between research, extension, growers, and pheromone-supply companies for the successful implementation of the mating disruption technique. In the vineyards where mating disruption has been successfully applied as an areawide strategy, the reduction in insecticide use has improved the quality of life for growers, consumers, as well as the public living near wine-growing areas and has thereby reduced the conflict between agricultural and urban communities.
Integrated pest management
Natural enemies
Pheromone mating disruption
Plant volatiles
Controllo integrato
Nemici naturali
Confusione sessuale con feromoni
Composti volatili delle piante
2011
Ioriatti, C.; Anfora, G.; Tasin, M.; De Cristofaro, A.; Witzgall, P.; Lucchi, A. (2011). Chemical ecology and management of Lobesia botrana (Lepidoptera: Tortricidae). JOURNAL OF ECONOMIC ENTOMOLOGY, 104 (4): 1125-1137. doi: 10.1603/EC10443 handle: http://hdl.handle.net/10449/20282
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Utilizza questo identificativo per citare o creare un link a questo documento: https://hdl.handle.net/10449/20282
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